CompletelyCassidy

Completely Cassidy.

CompletelyCassidy

Completely Cassidy, by Tamsyn Murray.

What it is about:

“My life is a joke. Actually, that’s not true – it’s too TRAGIC to be funny – but it IS a total disaster. You might think that I sound a teensy bit DRAMA-QUEEN-ISH here but that’s because you don’t know the full horror.”

So says Cassidy Bond at the beginning of her story about the first term at her new school as a Year Seven. Her mother’s pregnant, her father’s an Elvis Presley impersonator, her brother’s in a rock band, one of her two best friends is acting very strangely. Throw in a test that shows she’s a genius, an inter-school quiz and a talent show, and you’ve got everything for a clever and amusing book told through the eyes of an 11-12 year old.

If I told you any more, it would spoil the story.

What is it like?

AngelaNicely

Angela Nicely.

AngelaNicely

Angela Nicely, by Alan MacDonald. Illustraed by David Roberts.

What it’s about:

Three short stories. Three funny situations. One single-minded, determined little girl.

Angela Nicely (about 6 years old, I think) is an engaging, if not what you’d call a well-behaved, girl. Her misbehaviour is not malicious (perhaps with the exception of getting her modelling rival wet) as much as singularly focused. Who wouldn’t want to figure out if the head teacher is wearing a wig? How else are you meant to get on top in the modelling game? And when a weekend spa turns out to be a weekend arghh!, you have to do something, right?

What is it like?

DaisyMaloneandtheblueglowingstone

Daisy Malone and the Blue Glowing Stone.

DaisyMaloneandtheblueglowingstone

Daisy Malone and the Blue Glowing Stone by James O’Loghlin

What it’s about.

Daisy and her talking dog, Ben, allow Daisy’s curiosity to lead them straight into an adventure that involves destroying the world…or saving it, depending on what happens. A blue glowing stone turns up in their lives and crazily enough it has a connection to her mother, an archaeologist at a dig some distance away. Who to trust and who to depend on becomes all important in this race to prevent an evil alien villain from ruling the universe.

What is it like?

BrowniesHelpingHands

Brownies: Helping Hands.

BrowniesHelpingHands

Brownies: Helping Hands by Caroline Palisted, illustrated by Katie Wood.

What it’s about:

Katie, Ellie, Charlie, Jamila and Grace are best friends who’ve recently joined the Brownies. Have you heard of the Brownies? They are the group for younger members of the Girl Scout Movement, though that group has different names in different countries of the world.

And that’s what these girls and their Brownies group are going to learn about for “Thinking Day”!

What is it like?

Camp Chaos

Camp Chaos (A Go Girl book).

Camp Chaos

Camp Chaos by Meredith Badger (go girl series)

What it’s about:

Sophie is a girl stuck between two friends. Megan is her oldest friend and Alice is her newest. Megan likes reading magazines, talking about clothes and make-up, and Alice likes running around and playing games. Megan doesn’t like Alice and Alice doesn’t like Megan.

Sophie find this hard enough, but when they all end up sharing the same tent at camp, things get very uncomfortable!

What is it like?

JesusDoveBaptism

The Father’s Spirit of Sonship.

The Father’s Spirit of Sonship: Reconceiving the Trinity.

 

by Thomas G. Weinandy, O.F.M.Cap. Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1995.

When I first heard of Weinandy’s book, I was both excited and frustrated. Excited, because it spoke of the Spirit being integrally involved in the begetting of the Son; frustrated, because the very person I first heard about this book from had rejected a similar thesis I had put to them (the similarities of which were confirmed via a short email exchange)!

Ruffled feathers aside, I began to try to get myself a copy. The first problem: it is out of print. Second problem: the only (three) second-hand copies I could find would cost me over AU$250.00 if I bought the one in America, or over AU$400.00 if I bought one of the two in Britain! Finally I decided on a course of action with a fair amount of cheek – I contacted Father Weinandy himself. Fortunately for me, he thought $400 was too much for 160 pages and managed to get a copy to me for much, much less. Thank you Father Tom.

His book is far better than my thesis, and far better than any of the attempts to explain Weinandy’s views found on the internet – and that will include the present one.